Historic Buildings Consultant

Bromley Court Hotel, London

Bromley Court Hotel, London

Bromley Court Hotel, London

The Bromley Court Hotel, an unlisted building located in the London Borough of Bromley, began as a suburban villa constructed in an Italianate style by Charles Long (1760-1838), later 1st Baron Farnborough. Long was a patron of the arts, being a founder member of the British Institution for Promoting the Fine Arts, instrumental in founding the National Gallery and was a trustee of the British Museum. He was also an MP, a close political ally of William Pitt the Younger, whose negotiations with rival Henry Addington took place at what was then called Bromley Hill Place. Charles Long's wife, Amelia, was a well-respected amateur watercolourist who was made an honorary exhibitor at the Royal Academy from 1807-22 and was the subject of much praise from contemporary commentators.

The building was converted to a hotel in the early 20th century and has been much extended since, although many decorative features of the original core of the house remain intact. In 1963, the hotel opened what would become known as The Bromel Club, where many now-famous groups, singers and songwriters, among them The Who, David Bowie and Eric Clapton, were early performers.

The instruction comprised a thorough Historic Building Appraisal of the hotel, focussing on the original early 19th century house and the 19th and early 20th century additions, in order to establish the development history of the building and the elements within which were worthy of retention and contributed to the significance of the building, both as a late Georgian suburban villa and later as a music venue.